3.11.11

A Walk Around Bacolod City!


Part II - Visayas series (8.11)


It's still raining. After  a rather long night of staring at the big screen playing some scary playstation game about a Japanese photographer fighting ghosts with a camera, I woke up from a dreamless sleep (which is a big relief on my part since I'm not really into any ghost -stuff because I kinda scare quite easily, no matter how tough I pretend to be).  We had a hearty breakfast of typical Chinese-Filipino dishes and more getting-to-know banter between me and my hosts in which a number of things to do and places to visit where passed around.  A quick see-around of Iloilo was seriously considered since I've never set foot on that island, and a friend was there at that time. Would've been a nice detour if the weather cooperated… but then it didn't. So with the morning plans dissolved, we were resigned to entertaining ourselves in front of the big screen. Again.

The morning rushed by fast, which was really okay with me if it didn't since I honestly wasn't very encouraged to go out as it was a bit cold and wet outside. Nevertheless, we headed out to explore the city right after lunch.



The San Sebastian Cathedral.



Our first stop (second actually since we first passed by the City Plaza which is right in front of it. But whichever.)  It   was the work of Fr. Mauricio Ferrero, then parish priest of Bacolod. It's quite old but certainly not the oldest in the country. The original church was built in 1825 while the cathedral was constructed in 1876. It is an imposing structure made of coral stones and lime from Guimaras and wood from Palawan.



Golden... This ain't that bad, really.

It was all dark inside the huge structure when we visited so I didn't get a good picture. Or so I thought.




More pictures..






After a few more clicks, we bid this pretty big thing goodbye to head off and see more of the city. We took a jeepney to the museum which is also conveniently near the capitol.



The Capitol.



The Negros Museum.



Situated on South Capitol Road, the Negros museum is a treasure cove of information on the city's history, culture, and industry.  The 19th century two-storey building is frequented by schoolchildren and adults alike, especially by tourists (like  me) wanting to know more about the city of smiles. 



It wasn't that big but the exhibits were entertaining and informative enough for 20 bucks per person and half of that for children.








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